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Monuments
 
Ancestral Goa

Located at Laoulim, 10-km from Margao, ancestral Goa is a mock up village dating Back a century. Built in a verdant hillside, a guided trek takes one down the Goan memory lane. Amidst a variety of rare wild flowers and mushrooms, a variety of exquisite insects and mushrooms and birds are also sighted. A species of frog, now almost extinct, which was once a Goan delicacy, might also hop out along the trail. There are popular places to hangout, one of which is the sprawling village that has a natural spring, a fisherman's hut, marketplace, mansion of 'Dona Maria' and traditional Goan artisans at work. One can stop by the 'Traverena', the country liquor shop, warm up with a peg of Goan Feni distilled at the 'Bhatti' and play an ancient game of 'tabla' or sit on mud benches in the verandah of the farmers' house relishing roasted seeds and other Goan eats.

Life Style at Ancestral Goa

Local feasts and festivals are celebrated with traditional style and fervor’s visit to Ancestral Goa on any of the fest days, allows for a pure-experience of Goan customs and lifestyles. The Eat-out offers a menu full of traditional Goan Specialties. Local vegetables, fish and sweets are treats to be indulged in.

The Convent Or The Royal Monastery

Located on the Holy Hill, Old Goa, Panjim.  The convent is also referred to as the royal monastery on account of the royal patronage it enjoyed. There were eleven chapels in the convent apart from the novitiate and the seminary for girls. The church in the monastery is dedicated to St. Mary. At present the building houses the Mater dei Institute for nuns, which were inaugurated in 1964.

 

Church Of the Carmelites

The church was built in 1621. The Carmelites, on their refusing to take the Oath of Allegiance to the king, were expelled from Goa in 1707. The church fell into disuse and ruins soon after.

Nothing remains of the Church of the Carmelites excepting the façade and a raised pavement, which served as an altar. Its location is to the southeast of the Church of St. Cajetan’s and is on a hill more or less contiguous to the hill on which the Chapel of Our Lady of the Mount stands.

The Gate Of The College Of St. Paul

The College of St. Paul, once the principal institution of Jesuits in India for imparting knowledge on Christianity, was built over the ruins of a mosque south of St. Cajetan's church at Old Goa in 1542. However, it was abandoned during the outbreak of plague in 1570 and went into disuse.

The Government demolished this ruining structure in 1832 to carry materials for building construction in Panaji. What remains of the college that was completed in 1542 and of the collegiate church consecrated on 25 January 1543 is the façade in the shape of an arch with a niche at the top and a cross crowning it. The arch that led to the College as a gateway is built of laterite, flanked on either side by a basalt column of the Corinthian order on raised plinth, and supported by basalt pilasters of the Doric order.

The College of St. Paul, once the principal institution of Jesuits in India for imparting knowledge on Christianity, was built over the ruins of a mosque south of St. Cajetan's church at Old Goa in 1542. However, it was abandoned during the outbreak of plague in 1570 and went into disuse.


The Gate Of The Palace Of Adil Shah

The Palace of Adil Shah at Old Goa was the most prominent building with magnificent lofty staircases. It was the residence of the Portuguese governors till 1695, and was afterwards used by them on festive occasions. It was deserted during the epidemic in the 18th century, was demolished in 1820 and the materials carried to Panjim for construction of houses.

Now only the gate remains which is architecturally purely Brahminical in style. Six steps in front of the gate lead to the raised platform on which the gate stands. It is made of basalt and consists of a horizontal lintel resting on pillars decorated with mouldings and having on the outer side fragmentary perforated screens.

The Palace of Adil Shah at Old Goa was the most prominent building with magnificent lofty staircases. It was the residence of the Portuguese governors till 1695, and was afterwards used by them on festive occasions. It was deserted during the epidemic in the 18th century, was demolished in 1820 and the materials carried to Panjim for construction of houses.

The Pillory

Where the Kuchcha road branches off from the road to Neura, leading to the Church and Convent of the Cross of Miracles , is a lone pillar on a raised platform, which once occupied the central place in the city square, and was used for punishing offenders of the law, who were tied to it and publicly whipped.

It was in use during the Portuguese rule till the end of the 17th century. The pillar, which is of basalt, had iron rings fixed to it and from its shape and mouldings it appears that the pillar might have formed part of a Brahmanical temple.

Where the Kuchcha road branches off from the road to Neura, leading to the Church and Convent of the Cross of Miracles , is a lone pillar on a raised platform, which once occupied the central place in the city square, and was used for punishing offenders of the law, who were tied to it and publicly whipped.

The Viceroy's Arch

The main road in front of the Church of St. Cajetan leads to the river Mandovi through an archway known as the Viceroy's Arch. The arch is made of laterite except for the façade on the riverside, which is facetted with greenish granite. The façade has a niche at the top with a statue in stone of Vasco da Gama. Correspondingly, in the rear, is a statue of the Argonaut. There are two inscribed slabs alongside the walls in the arch.

Though the Portuguese built the original structure soon after the conquest of the city, the arch underwent considerable changes. The arch was completely re-built in 1954 retaining the statues excepting the bronze statue of St. Catherine, which was at the top of the structure in a separate niche.

The inscription on the original arch recording that the Governor, Francisco da Gama, rebuilt the arch can still be seen on this arch. Another inscription on it is dedicated to the Immaculate Conception of Virgin Mary, commemorating the emancipation of Portugal from Spain in 1656.

Ruins Of St. Augustine's Tower

Built in 1602, the only ruin of the Church of St. Augustine on the Holy Hill at Old Goa near the Nunnery is a lofty 46-metre high tower defying the torrential rains. The tower is one of the four of St. Augustine Church that once stood there. There were eight richly adorned chapels and four altars, and a convent with numerous cells and artistic columns attached to the church.

The Church when intact was perhaps the biggest in Goa. With the religious suppression in 1835, the Augustinians deserted the church and the convent. The latter was used for some time by the charitable institution of the Misericordia. The buildings fell into neglect resulting in the collapse of the vault on 8 September 1842. The Government appropriated the property selling the materials the following year. The façade and half of the tower fell in 1931 and some more parts of it collapsed in 1938.


The College of  St. Paul

paul collage On the road to Ponda one can see the Arch of The College of St. Paul built in 1542 by Diogo Borva and Minguel Vaz. It was the seminary of Sante Fe, which was handed over to the Jesuits to start a teaching institute. St. Francis Xavier arrived in Goa on the 6th May 1542 as the Papal Nuncio. The College was consecrated on the 25th of January 1543, the feast of St. Paul, St. Francis Xavier taught at this college. At one time there were 38 Jusuit teachers and 3000 students, including a few Japanese who had been converted by the Saint during his mission in that country. The Institute had the first printing press in Asia. Jesuit Priests from this same institute went to Fatehpur-Sikri, the capital of Akbar the Great Moghul at his invitation.


In the same complex and very near to the Arch is the Chapel of St. Francis Xavier where he offered mass. He used the water of the well attached to the chapel for drinking. Further down the path is another well with steps leading down into the water. It is now rather over grown with shrubs; the Saint is said to have used this water for bathing.

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